My America. Yours Too?

28 09 2017

Let me start by saying that this is not a political post–I won’t be taking sides. I respect the opinions of other people. We live in a free country where equality is celebrated. But as I think back over the weeks and months, I am filled with great sadness. There have been moments when I’ve been proud of America, moments such as Hurricane Harvey, when so many offered help to the Texans affected by bringing in food, resources, volunteering physical labor for clearing and rebuilding. Moments such as Hurricane Irma, when we offered our neighbors in Florida the assistance they needed to find safety, get clean water, and begin the monumental task of reconstruction. Now we are faced with yet another hurricane which has totally devastated our territory of Puerto Rico, whose people are also American citizens. They need the help of their neighbors more than ever before, and I hope we will stand the test and be there for them in every possible way, because there is such great need there.

But there is much going on in our world that makes me sad. We are quick to judge without checking facts. We accept what we read on facebook and twitter without checking facts. We superimpose motives to the actions of people without finding out the story behind the action—without checking facts. We rush to conclusions without an open heart to hear what the facts are. We trust the word of certain people just because they said it, without checking facts. Yes, two people can look at the same situation and have two differing opinions. Everyone comes from unique backgrounds and has their own take. But we have to start from the point of truth before forming an opinion. And many times a person’s opinion comes from their personal experiences, often painful ones. Shouldn’t we be respecting their pain? Shouldn’t we be trying to understand rather than condemn? Shouldn’t we be actively listening with our hearts?

My sadness comes from all the unrest, the disunity, the bickering over unimportant things. I believe we were created to be kind, to do unto others as we would wish it would be done to us, to think of others before ourselves, to help each other, affirm each other, love (unconditionally) each other, forgive each other (because goodness knows we need all kinds of forgiveness ourselves) and be tolerant and understanding of each other. And to give grace by being willing to allow those differing opinions. Because no one knows what it is to walk in my shoes. No one knows what it is to walk in yours. Pure, sincere empathy should be what we all strive for without rush to judgement or the impulse we have of “you’re wrong and I’m right.” God will take care of the judging.

Why can’t we be blind to color? Why can’t we embrace our differences? Why can’t we respect each other instead of condemning and belittling and mocking those not like us or with a different opinion than ours? Why can’t we value each other? Why can’t we listen with open minds? We have a rich mix of ethnicities, backgrounds, ideas, viewpoints, creativities, and opportunities in this country. We can all contribute to the greatness possible in America. “God so loved the WORLD that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth on Him shall have everlasting life.” John 3:16.

I don’t see any exclusions there. Do you?

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A Lesson in Compassion–Part Two

2 02 2015

I adore Anne Lamott. Her books border on irreverent, and yet there is such a wealth of faith and honesty in them. She says what most of us feel but are afraid to say. Last spring I was privileged to hear her speak at the Festival of Faith and Writing and discovered tIhat she speaks the way she writes—so straightforward and from the heart.

Her post on facebook last week hit home with me: “The world is always going to be a dangerous place, and people get badly banged up, but how can there be more meaning than helping one another stand up in the wind and stay warm?”

That is empathy. One of the best comparisons of empathy versus sympathy is a youtube short I’ve included below. 

If you have the ability to experience the feelings of another person, you have empathy for them. It goes beyond sympathy, the caring and understanding of the suffering of someone. Those words differ in their emotional meaning. Sympathy is acknowledging another person’s emotional hardships and providing comfort and assurance. With empathy you understand their feelings because you have experienced it yourself in some way–you can put yourself in their shoes.

Then there is compassion. You feel empathy for someone, you want to help alleviate their suffering, and you take action by putting that person first.

Sympathy focuses on awareness
Empathy focuses on experience
Compassion focuses on action

I can feel your pain. It must be so hard to get through alone. Is there any way I can help? And then give that person a hug. You have no idea how much that small action will mean to someone in the pit. I know. It means the world.

p.s. I apologize for the different fonts and font sizes. I’m having  difficulty in adapting to the new WordPress format.